Workers

Update: New Work Permits for Francophones / Mettre a jour : Nouveau Permis de Travail pour des Francophones

Do you speak fluent French or know someone who does and wants to come to Canada?  New work permits are now available for francophone persons who want to live outside of Quebec. 

Here are some of the details: 

  • Francophone persons who want to work in provinces outside of Quebec can qualify. 
  • To obtain a work permit they must be offered a position in the managerial, professional or technical/skilled trades occupations
  • These work permits will not require LMIAs and can be used to apply for work permits in the first instance or to extend your work permit if you're already in Canada.

Contact us at (416) 548-9101, or at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com if you or someone you know are fluent in French and would like to come to Canada. 

To sign up for our newsletter to ensure that you will receive future emails on immigration changes, click here.

French version:

Parlez-vous français? Savez-vous quelqu'un qui peut et qui veut venir au Canada?

Les nouveaux permis de travails sont disponibles maintenant, pour les travailleur qualifies francophone qui ont l'intention de travailler dans une communauté a l'extérieur du Québec.

Ici sont les détails:

  • Personnes francophones qui cherchent à s'établir dans une province autre que le Québec peuvent qualifier.

  • Pour obtenir ce permis de travail, personne doit avoir une offre d'emploi dans un métier spécialisé, managérial, ou professionnel.

  • Ces permis de travails n'exigent pas des études d'impact sur le marché du travail, et peut être utilisé pour appliquer pour un nouveau permis de travail ou pour prolonger votre permis de travail si vous êtes déjà au Canada.

Contactez-nous à (416) 548-9101, ou à inquiries@lmlawgroup.com si vous ou quelqu'un que vous savez sont fluent en français et voulons venir au Canada.

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New Work Permits for Francophones

The government has just announced that starting on June 1, 2016, francophone persons (people who are fluent in French) will be entitled to special work permits throughout Canada.  Here are some of the details: 

  • Francophone persons who want to work in provinces outside of Quebec can qualify
  • To obtain a work permit they must be offered a position in the managerial, professional or technical/skilled trades occupations 
  • These work permits will not require LMIAs.

Contact us at (416) 548-9101, or at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com if you or someone you know are fluent in French and would like to come to Canada.  

To sign up for our newsletter to ensure that you will receive future emails on immigration changes, click here.

 

Sincerely,

Long Mangalji LLP

Tips about the new Caregiver Program

The new Caregiver program that replaced the old Live-in-Caregiver program has created much confusion for families who want to hire caregivers and for workers who want to immigrate under this program.  Here are some of the tips about the program that may help you: 

  • It has become quite difficult to get a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) for caregivers. A recent Toronto Star article reported that less than 10% of applications have been approved since the new program started.  It is still possible to obtain a LMIA for a caregiver in some locations.  However, we highly advise obtaining advice and representation when deciding to submit your application.
  • Those persons with open work permits (such as post-grad work permits, spousal work permits, or IEC work permits), however, may now qualify for permanent residence under the Caregiver program if they work for 2 years in Canada taking care of a child, elderly person, or a person living with a chronic illness or disability.  (Please note that students would not be able to use their work experience gained while they are studying full-time for this program).  
  • Given the difficulties of obtaining an LMIA, families may find it easier to find persons with open work permits to work for them rather than applying for LMIAs.
  • Persons with open work permits may also find the Caregiver program an easier way to obtain permanent residence than the Express Entry system.

To find out how if this program is right for you, contact us at (416) 548-9101, or at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com.

 

4-In, 4-Out Rule for Work Permits

On April 1, many work permit holders who have worked in Canada for over 4 years may not be able to renew their work permits.  This is because the government implemented a regulation known as the "4-in, 4-out rule".  Here's how it works: 

  • Most foreign workers who have worked in Canada for four years since April 1, 2011 will be unable to renew their work permits until 4 more years have passed. 
  • Some work permits are exempt from the 4-in, 4-out rule:
    • Work permits for occupations under O and A NOC codes
    • Work permits under international agreements such as NAFTA
    • Intra-company transferee work permits
    • Bridging work permits
    • PNP work permits that are employer-specific
    • Some spousal work permits
    • Self-support and humanitarian work permits
    • Work permits under the SAWP
  • Also, work that is done while a person is studying full-time does not count towards the 4 years of work for the 4-in, 4-out rule.
  • Finally, if you've held work permits for 4 years since April 1, 2011 but have a gap in employment during these 4 years, you may be able to get an extension for the period of time in which you were not working.

To find out if the 4-in, 4-out rule applies to you and what you need to do to stay in Canada, contact us at (416) 548-9101, or at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com.

 

New Changes to LMIA-Exempt Work Permits

Starting from last Saturday, February 21, 2015, the government has begun to impose new processes and fees for applicants who want to apply for work permits that don't require a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA).  Here are some of the main changes:

  • Employers who want to hire foreign workers with work permits that are LMIA-exempt and tied to an employer (eg. Intra-company Transferees, NAFTA and other free-trade agreement professionals, some PNP nominees, Significant Benefit) are now required to submit a form outlining the details of the job and pay a fee of $230. 
  • Employers may be subject to compliance reviews for these workers and must adhere to the terms stated in the form.  Non-compliance may mean the inability to hire future foreign workers and heavy fines. 
  • Persons who are applying for open work permits will be required to pay an additional fee of $100.  This will affect people who are applying for post-grad work permits, spousal work permits, bridging work permits, and some PNP work permits.