Entry to Canada

New Medical Inadmissibility Changes

The Minister has just announced today important new changes to the medical inadmissibility policy. Individuals and their dependants who apply for permanent residence under most applications in economic categories, some humanitarian and compassionate categories, and some family sponsorship categories such as parents/grandparent sponsorships, are still required to pass medical admissibility.  

However, today's announcement will allow a significant number of people who would have previously been found to be medically inadmissible to no longer be in this category.  Here are some key points to note:

  • The threshold amount of medical costs for medical inadmissibility will now be tripled.  This means that many applicants who require higher medical costs to deal with their conditions (eg. HIV positive individuals who use government funded prescriptions) may now no longer be medically inadmissible.
  • Special education, social and vocational rehabilitation services, and personal support services will no longer be included in the medical costs.  As such, many individuals dealing with disabilities will now no longer be medically inadmissible.

Many applicants or their dependants who previously were found to be medically inadmissible may now reapply for permanent residence.

To speak with one of our lawyers to discuss your case, contact us at (416) 548-9101 or by email at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com.

Our Response to the American Immigration Ban

U.S. President Donald Trump has signed an executive order that closed the U.S. border to people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan and Yemen.  As we have seen in the news, enforcement of the order has unleashed chaos at airports and many people have been left in immigration limbo. 

To assist in responding to this crisis, Long Mangalji is currently offering free immigration consultations to those affected by this order and are interested in exploring immigration options to Canada.

If you are from one of these countries and would like to book a consultation with one of our lawyers, contact us at (416) 548-9101 or inquiries@lmlawgroup.com.

ETA Update

As of November 10, 2016, most foreign nationals from countries that are visa-exempt (except for Americans) will be required to have an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) prior to flying into Canada.

Here are some of the key points to note:  

  • Citizens of the United States of America, Permanent Residents of Canada, and other small exempted groups will not require an eTA to board a flight to Canada.  
  • If you want to enter Canada by land or sea, you will not need an eTA.
  • The eTAs are normally issued for 5 years or until the expiry date of your passport. If you have to renew or replace your passport a new eTA will be required. 
  • Work permits and study permits issued by the visa post and at the border after July 31, 2015 may already have eTAs attached to them.
  • Dual Canadian citizens must now travel on their Canadian passports unless they receive special authorization (see below). 
  • Individuals with any criminal history may be denied an eTA and be determined inadmissible to enter Canada.  If you do have a criminal record it is strongly recommended that you consult one of our lawyers prior to making an eTA application.

Until January 31, 2017, a Canadian with dual citizenship may apply for a special authorization allowing them to travel to Canada without their Canadian passport if they:

  • Have a flight booked to Canada that leaves in less than 10 days, and
  • Have a valid passport from a visa-exempt country, and
  • Meet one of the following conditions:
    • Have previously received a certificate of Canadian citizenship;
    • Held a Canadian passport in the past; or
    • Were granted Canadian citizenship after having been a Permanent Resident of Canada.

This special authorization will be valid for only 4 days from the date of travel selected on the application form. If it is not used within that time, a new authorization will be required.

To find out more information about these changes, contact us at (416) 548-9101, or at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com

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New "Leniency Period" Announced for ETAs


The government had previously announced that starting March 15, most nationals from countries that are visa-exempt (except for Americans) will be required to apply for an Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA) prior to flying into Canada.  See here for more details.

However, the government has recently announced that there will be a "Leniency Period" from now until an unspecified date in the fall of 2016 when travellers will be able to enter Canada without an ETA.  If you have already applied for an ETA, please see below for details on how this might affect you: 

  • If you've applied for an ETA and have received an approval, then you should travel with the ETA and the passport that you had used for your ETA application.

  • If you've applied for an ETA and have not yet received a decision, you can travel to Canada.  Make sure that you double check your email before travelling though to ensure that you did not receive a decision.

  • If you've applied for an ETA and have received a negative decision, you cannot travel to Canada until you apply again and receive a positive decision.  Contact us for more information on how to do so.

Contact us at (416) 548-9101, or at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com if you have had your ETA rejected and need to enter Canada. 

To sign up for our newsletter to ensure that you will receive future emails on immigration changes, click here.

 

New ETA Requirement for Visa-Exempt Travellers

UPDATE: The government has announced a "Leniency Period" until Fall 2016 where travellers can still enter Canada without a ETA.  See here for more details.

On March 15, most nationals from countries that are visa-exempt (except for Americans) will be required to apply for an Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA) prior to flying into Canada.

Here are some of the key points to note:  

  • If you want to fly into Canada after March 15, 2016 and are not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, American, or hold a visa of temporary resident permit, you will likely need an ETA or visa.
  • If you want to enter Canada by land or sea, you will not need an ETA.
  • ETAs are normally issued for up to 5 years and are attached to your passport.  If you've had to renew your passport, you will need to apply for another ETA.
  • Work permits and study permits issued by the visa post and at the border after July 31, 2015 may already have ETAs attached to them.
  • If you hold a study permit, work permit, or visitor record and you do not have an ETA, you will have to apply for an ETA if you want to travel outside of Canada or the United States.  If you travel to the United States only and you return to Canada before your status ends, you do not have to apply for an ETA.

To find out more information about these changes, contact us at (416) 548-9101, or at inquiries@lmlawgroup.com.

 

Sincerely,

Long Mangalji LLP